All digital collections now migrated to the new Reed Digital Collections!

With the successful migration of the last four collections, the new Reed Digital Collections is now the place to go for digital access to etheses, Artists’ Books, rare books and archival materials, and faculty teaching and research collections. The old system will remain available through January.

The four final collections are:

We want to hear back from you! Do you like the new interface? What could be improved? Let us know by filling out this survey.

What happens with My Workspace galleries?

Don’t worry; your galleries will still be available. Over the course of the Fall semester, galleries migrated and become visible in the new system. Gallery migration will be finalized in January 2017.

What is Reed Digital Collections, again?

Reed Digital Collections is where you will find many Reed theses in electronic form, digitized materials like yearbooks, photos, and manuscripts from Special Collections and Archives, images of art and architecture for use in the classroom, and many faculty-curated teaching and research collections. The Library and CIS have been working hard on rebuilding the software from the ground up to make it more functional, more intuitive, and more fun to work with.

Questions? Comments? Concerns? Have a great idea for a new collection? Contact rdc@lists.reed.edu or laura.buchholz@reed.edu

 

Reed Electronic Theses, Wheeler Physics lecture notes, and more available in the new Reed Digital Collections

We’re in the home stretch! Five more collections have migrated to our new Reed Digital Collections (RDC) interface:

What happens with My Workspace galleries?

Don’t worry; your galleries will still be available. Over the course of the Fall semester, galleries will migrate and become visible in the new system. At first, you will only see galleries containing images from collections available in the new interface. If a collection is not yet visible in the new interface, you won’t see that collection’s images in your galleries yet. Galleries will appear as soon as the collection is moved over. If the collection is not yet visible, please continue to use galleries in the old interface at http://cdm-workspace.reed.edu//workspace.

What is Reed Digital Collections, again?

Reed Digital Collections is where you will find many Reed theses in electronic form, digitized materials like yearbooks, photos, and manuscripts from Special Collections and Archives, images of art and architecture for use in the classroom, and many faculty-curated teaching and research collections. The Library and CIS have been working hard on rebuilding the software from the ground up to make it more functional, more intuitive, and more fun to work with.

Questions? Comments? Concerns? Have a great idea for a new collection? Contact rdc@lists.reed.edu or laura.buchholz@reed.edu

Reed Archives, Early Writing and Printing, and more available in the new Reed Digital Collections

Join us on our march toward a better digital collections future! Several more collections have migrated to our new system, as of today. Visit the following in the new Reed Digital Collections (RDC) interface:

These collections join our RDC debut collections: the Art & Architecture collection, the library’s collection of Antiquarian Maps, and history professor Doug Fix’s Formosa collection. All remaining collections will be moved during the Fall semester.

What happens with My Workspace galleries?

Don’t worry; your galleries will still be available. Over the course of the Fall semester, galleries will migrate and become visible in the new system. At first, you will only see galleries containing images from collections available in the new interface. If a collection is not yet visible in the new interface, you won’t see that collection’s images in your galleries yet. Galleries will appear as soon as the collection is moved over. If the collection is not yet visible, please continue to use galleries in the old interface at http://cdm-workspace.reed.edu//workspace.

What is Reed Digital Collections, again?

Reed Digital Collections is where you will find many Reed theses in electronic form, digitized materials like yearbooks, photos, and manuscripts from Special Collections and Archives, images of art and architecture for use in the classroom, and many faculty-curated teaching and research collections. The Library and CIS have been working hard on rebuilding the software from the ground up to make it more functional, more intuitive, and more fun to work with.

Questions? Comments? Concerns? Have a great idea for a new collection? Contact rdc@lists.reed.edu or laura.buchholz@reed.edu

New interface for Reed Digital Collections (RDC)

Reed Digital Collections (RDC) is getting a new interface! The Library and CIS have been working hard on rebuilding the software from the ground up to make it more functional, more intuitive, and more fun to work with.

We will be moving to the new system slowly. As of today, the Art & Architecture collection, the library’s collection of Antiquarian Maps, and history professor Doug Fix’s Formosa collection are available in the new interface. All other collections will be moved during the Fall semester.

What happens with My Workspace galleries?

Don’t worry; your galleries will still be available. Over the course of the Fall semester, galleries will migrate and become visible in the new system. At first, you will only see galleries containing images from collections available in the new interface. If a collection is not yet visible in the new interface, you won’t see that collection’s images in your galleries yet. Galleries will appear as soon as the collection is moved over. If the collection is not yet visible, please continue to use galleries in the old interface at http://cdm-workspace.reed.edu//workspace.

What is Reed Digital Collections, again?

Reed Digital Collections is where you will find many Reed theses in electronic form, digitized materials like yearbooks, photos, and manuscripts from Special Collections and Archives, images of art and architecture for use in the classroom, and many faculty-curated teaching and research collections.

Questions? Comments? Concerns? Have a great idea for a new collection? Contact rdc@lists.reed.edu or laura.buchholz@reed.edu

Digital Loeb Classical Library now available

The Digital Loeb Classical Library is now available online for the Reed community. This important archive complements the library’s print offering of classical Greek and Latin texts.

Key features include:
• Single- and dual-language reading modes
• Sophisticated Bookmarking and Annotation features
• Tools for sharing Bookmarks and Annotations
• Greek keyboard
• User account and My Loeb content saved in perpetuity
• Intuitive Search and Browse

Some of the site’s most useful tools are features of “My Loebs,” the personal accounts available to all authorized users. You can create your own account (via the “Sign up” link at the top of each page on the site) so as to utilize the digital Loeb Classical Library’s full capabilities.

http://www.loebclassics.com.

Video trial – The Criterion Collection

Widely considered the best of world cinema and comprising some of the most influential works of the last century, The Criterion Collection showcases the definitive versions of seminal titles in the history of motion pictures. Features accompanying the films include HD streaming, scrolling transcripts, and shareable clips and playlists. The trial ends 9/20. Please send feedback to Jim Holmes.

New in Reed Digital Collections!

The library is happy to announce two new additions to Reed Digital Collections.

Nicholas Wheeler Physics Lectures

Nicholas Wheeler taught Physics at Reed from 1963 to 2010. Although his writings were never published, 27 volumes of his lecture notes on all the topics he taught were written out in his clear calligraphic script and bound for deposit in the Reed Library. These notes have become something of a cult classic and are still sought out by graduates of his classes. They have now been digitized and are presented in this collection for consultation and access by all.

Early Printing and Writing Collection

The Early Printing and Writing Collection consists of complete letters, documents, and manuscript books from all over Europe and several New World countries. Examples range from the early 15th century into the 20th century, with emphasis on the 16th and 17th centuries. From letters to tally books, archeological reports to war statistics, and Inquisition warrants to legal battles, these items are also of great historical interest worthy of scholarly study. They are unique and are only now available for such study.

New Pauly Supplements trial

The Library is offering trial access to Brill’s New Pauly Supplements, vols 1-6. These reference works complement Reed’s current holdings of the seminal and comprehensive New Pauly resource. Users are invited to send comments to Angie Beiriger no later than April 30.

Individual titles in the series:
 1. Chronologies of the Ancient World
Lists all rulers and dynasties that made their mark on ancient history, from the Mesopotamian kings around 3000 BC to the Bishops and Patriarchs of Late Antiquity.
2. Dictionary of Greek and Latin Authors and Texts
An overview of authors and Major Works of Greek and Latin literature, and their history in written tradition, from Late Antiquity until present: papyri, manuscripts, Scholia, early and contemporary authoritative editions, and translations.
 3. Historical Atlas of the Ancient World
Covering the 3rd millennium BC until the 15th century AD, this new atlas of the ancient world illustrates the political, economic, social and cultural developments in the ancient Near East, the Mediterranean world, the Byzantine Empire, the Islamic world and the Holy Roman Empire.
  4. The Reception of Myth and Mythology
The routes and works through which the myths of Greece and Rome have passed into the cultural memory of Europe.
5. The Reception of Classical Literature
An overview of the reception and influence of ancient literary works on the literature, art and music from antiquity to the present.
6. History of Classical Scholarship
This dictionary charts the lives and works of more than 700 influential scholars from the 14th century onwards who have made their mark on the study of Antiquity.

Trial of Index Religiosus

The library is offering a trial of Index Religiosus Online. IRO is a reference bibliography for Theology, Religious Studies, and Church History offered in partnership with the KU Leuven and Université Catholique de Louvain. You can visit the site directly or access it via the database link on the BREPOLiS website.

The Index Religiosus

  • Replaces the bibliography of the ‘Revue d’histoire ecclésiastique’ and of the ‘Ephemerides Theologicae Lovanienses (Elenchus Bibliographicus)’
  • covers publications written in various European languages (English, French, German, Italian, Spanish, Dutch, etc
  • consist of some 565,000 bibliographic records
  • is updated yearly with 20,000 records
  • is OpenURL compliant
  • offers the possibility to export records in several formats (EndNOte, Refworks, Zotero, etc.)

A detailed leaflet about Index Religiosus is available for download.

Please send any feedback to Angie Beiriger by April 20, 2014.

Help Build the Digital Thesis Tower

Hey seniors – join your comrades in the Reed College Digital Thesis Tower!

Add your thesis to the Reed Senior Theses online archive and help build the digital thesis tower. Submit your thesis after you’ve completed your orals, made last corrections, and sent your thesis for printing. The version should be identical to your final, printed thesis. Participation is completely voluntary and does not replace your printed, bound thesis.

Go to the Electronic Thesis Information Page for details.

For more information or help with the process contact Angie Beiriger, Digital Assets Librarian, or send a message to etheses@lists.reed.edu.